National Poll Shows That Public Supports FDA Rule

Aug. 7 1996

Washington, DC - A national poll commissioned by the CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO-FREE KIDS shows strong support for the new Food and Drug Administration rule to reduce tobacco use among youth. The rule, announced by President Clinton on August 23, includes specific measures to limit youth access to tobacco and to reduce the appeal of tobacco to youth. The poll showed overwhelming support for the policy and its specific components. These findings are consistent across every region of the country, across all ages, income groups, among those with some college education or more and those with less education, and among whites and non-whites. The results include: • More than four out of five people (85.1%) agree with the President’s new policy, including 81.7% of smokers. Seven out of ten people (70.5%) agree strongly with the policy. • More than four out of five (83.9%) think that members of Congress should support the President’s policy. This includes 80.3% of those in the South and 78.1% of smokers. Women are even more likely to agree than men (88.0% vs. 79.5%). • Respondents overwhelmingly agreed with the policy’s efforts to reduce youth access to tobacco. In every case, smokers are as likely as non-smokers to agree. Specifically. • 95.5% agree that young people should be required to show a photo id before they are allowed to purchase tobacco products, including 94.9% of smokers. Nearly 9 out of 10 people (89.0%) strongly agree, including 86.8% of smokers. • 93.7% agree that stores be required to put cigarettes behind the counter and out of reach of children, including 90.2% of smokers. More than eight out of ten people (84.9%) strongly agree, including 79.5% of smokers. • 76.0% agree that the sale of single cigarettes and packages of less than 20 cigarettes be prohibited, including 71.1% of smokers. • Respondents strongly supported steps to limit advertising images associated with brands, such as Joe Camel or the Marlboro cowboy. In each case, women were even more likely than men to agree. These include: • 78.9% agree that tobacco advertising shouldn’t be in magazines read by kids, including almost 7 out of ten smokers (69.2%). Two-thirds of all respondents strongly agree (67.5%). • 77.8% agree that tobacco advertising shouldn’t be within 1000 feet of schools and playgrounds, including 7 out of ten smokers (71.9%). Two-thirds of all respondents strongly agree (67.0%). • 72.2% agree that tobacco advertising shouldn’t be on t-shirts, hats, backpacks or other items kids may wear or use, including 6 out of ten smokers (60.5%). • 70.1% agree that tobacco advertising shouldn’t be used to sponsor sporting events that large numbers of kids attend, including more than half of the smokers (55.9%). • More than four out of five people (82.8%) agree that tobacco companies should provide the funds to educate children about the effects of using tobacco, including 79.2% of smokers. Women are even more likely to agree than men (86.0% vs. 79.4%). Bruskin/Goldring Research conducted 1006 telephone interviews among a random-digit-dialing national sample of adults aged 18 and over (502 males, 504 females). Interviews were conducted on August 28, 1996. The margin of error is +/- 3.2 percentage points.

 

Media Contacts