Tobacco Unfiltered

New Survey Shows Need for Kenya to Take Strong Action to Save Lives from Tobacco Use

Survey finds 2.5 million Kenyans currently use tobacco

Editor
Dec 2, 2014

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An estimated 2.5 million Kenyans — over 11 percent of the country’s adult population — currently use tobacco, according to the first Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) ever conducted in Kenya. This smoking rate is the highest yet shown by a GATS survey in sub-Saharan Africa, underscoring the need for Kenya to take strong action to reduce tobacco use.

Kenya’s Ministry of Health released the survey results on November 28, highlighting the urgent need for the Kenyan government to fully implement the country’s tobacco control law and address rates of tobacco use that are sure to increase as the tobacco industry sets its sights on Africa.

Continue reading New Survey Shows Need for Kenya to Take Strong Action to Save Lives from Tobacco Use

posted December 02, 2014

Uganda’s First Adult Tobacco Survey Shows Peril and Opportunity to Head-off Epidemic

Ugandans strongly support measures to reduce tobacco use

Editor
Jul 7, 2014

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A new survey of tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke in Uganda shows that the country still has the opportunity to head off a burgeoning tobacco epidemic – but only if government leaders act fast to implement scientifically proven solutions.

Uganda's first-ever Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), released July 4, 2014 by the country's Ministry of Health, demonstrated both the threat tobacco use poses to the nation’s health and the opportunity for the government to take action.

Continue reading Uganda’s First Adult Tobacco Survey Shows Peril and Opportunity to Head-off Epidemic

posted July 07, 2014

New Report: Africa at Risk of Becoming “Epicenter of Tobacco Epidemic”

Report calls for strong measures to prevent and reduce tobacco use

Editor
Nov 20, 2013

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A new report by the American Cancer Society warns that without urgent action to prevent tobacco use, Africa will be the "future epicenter of the tobacco epidemic" with soaring rates of tobacco use and related disease and death.

According to the report, rates of tobacco use are likely to increase as African nations continue to experience strong economic and massive population growth. The number of African smokers will skyrocket from 77 million today to 572 million by 2100 unless proven measures to reduce tobacco use are implemented and enforced throughout the continent.

Continue reading New Report: Africa at Risk of Becoming “Epicenter of Tobacco Epidemic”

posted November 20, 2013

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We blog news and information about the global movement to reduce tobacco use and its devastating toll.

We expose the tobacco industry's deceitful practices and chronicle the work of advocates in the United States and around the globe who are battling the world’s leading cause of preventable death.

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