Home > Tobacco Unfiltered > Saudi Arabia requires smoke-free public places

Saudi Arabia requires smoke-free public places

Country steps up fight against tobacco

Posted by: Editor | Jul 31, 2012

photo

The Saudi Arabian government has significantly stepped up the nation’s fight against tobacco use by requiring public places to be smoke-free. The smoke-free policy will apply to government offices, restaurants, cafes, supermarkets and shopping malls in addition to airports, which have been smoke-free since 2011.  It even applies to water-pipes, or shisha.

The country’s new smoke-free policy will help reduce smoking and harmful exposure to secondhand smoke.  Among Saudi Arabian youth, 38 percent report being exposed to secondhand smoke in public places.

The government’s directive also prohibits the sale of tobacco to minors less than 18 years of age.

Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Interior said in a statement that he hoped that the smoke-free policy would serve as an example for other countries.

 

 

 

Join the Tobacco-Free Kids E-Newsletter

Learn More »
Outside the US? Click here. Are You Inside the US or Canada?
Close

Why Get Tobacco Unfiltered Email Alerts?

Get a heads up each time we blog news and information about the global tobacco epidemic and the movement to reduce tobacco use and its terrible toll of disease and death in the United States and around the world.

By signing up, you may also get occasional alerts about opportunities to fight Big Tobacco nationally. (See Our Privacy Policy)

Why Get Tobacco Unfiltered Email Alerts?

Get a heads up each time we blog news and information about the global tobacco epidemic and the movement to reduce tobacco use and its terrible toll of disease and death in the United States and around the world.

By signing up, you may also get occasional alerts about opportunities to fight Big Tobacco nationally. (See Our Privacy Policy)

About This Blog

We blog news and information about the global movement to reduce tobacco use and its devastating toll.

We expose the tobacco industry's deceitful practices and chronicle the work of advocates in the United States and around the globe who are battling the world’s leading cause of preventable death.

Comments? Feedback?