SmokeFreeKentucky.org: Everyone has the right to breathe smokefree indoor air

Why Go Smoke-Free?

Everyone has the right to breathe smoke-free indoor air

Secondhand smoke is a public health hazard.

  • There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke — Institute of Medicine, "Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects: Making Sense of the Evidence," October 2009

  • Secondhand smoke is the third leading cause of preventable death in the United States.  For every eight smokers the tobacco industry kills, it takes one non-smoker with them. — Glantz, S.A. Parmely, W., "Passive Smoking and Heart Disease: Epidemiology, Physiology, and Biochemistry," Circulation, 1991; 83(1):1-12; and, Taylor, A., Johnson, D, & Kazemi, H,. "Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Cardiovascular Disease," Circulation, 1992; 86:699-702)

  • Secondhand smoke contains more than 4,000 chemicals, 69 of which cause cancer including formaldehyde, arsenic, cyanide, and carbon monoxide. -National Cancer Institute. Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine. Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph No. 13. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, NIH Pub. No. 02-5074, October 2001.

  • The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that only 30 minutes of exposure to secondhand smoke can increase the risk of heart attack. -United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, October 2009 report, Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects.

  • Regular exposure to secondhand smoke, such as in restaurants and bars, increases one's chance of stroke by 50%. -Zhang, X. et al., “Association of Passive Smoking by Husbands with Prevalence of Stroke among Chinese Women Nonsmokers,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 2005; 161(3): 213-218.

  • Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke increase their risk of developing heart disease and lung cancer by 20-30%. –The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, June 27, 2006.

No one should have to choose between a job and good health.

  • Workers in smoke-filled 5 B's (bars, bowling alleys, billiard halls, betting establishments, and bingo parlors) breathe in carcinogen levels that are 47 times higher than the limit the federal government defines as unsafe indoor air quality. .-Siegel, M. “Exposure to secondhand smoke and excess lung cancer mortality risk among workers in the ‘5 B’s’: bars, bowling alleys, billiard halls, betting establishments, and bingo parlors.” Tobacco Control, 12:333-338, 2003.

  • The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the international standard-setting body for ventilation rates for acceptable indoor air quality, has determined that there are no ventilation or air cleaning technologies that can eliminate the health risks posed by secondhand smoke. -Position Document approved by ASHRAE Board of Directors June 30, 2005.

  • Smokefree policies decrease absenteeism among non-smoking employees and increases productivity. -Ryan, J, Zwerling, C, Orav, EJ. Occupational risks associated with cigarette smoking: a prospective study. American Journal of Public Health 1992; 82(1):29–32.

  • Secondhand smoke levels in restaurants are approximately 160-200% higher than in office workplaces, and the levels are 400-600% higher in bars.-Siegel, 1993.

Smokefree laws are good for health and business.

  • Over 23 peer-reviewed studies have shown that local communities have successfully implemented smokefree policies without adverse economic impact.

  • Restaurants in smokefree cities have a higher market value at resale (an average of 16%) than comparable restaurants located in cities that allow smoking indoors.

  • Restaurants in smokefree cities have on average a 16% higher market value at resale than comparable restaurants located in smoke-filled cities. –Alamar and Glantz October 2004 Issue of Contemporary Economic Policy.
  • Going smoke-free reduces cleaning and maintenance costs. The Building Owners and Managers Association, a national trade group, reports that indoor smoking increases cleaning costs and states “secondhand smoke does not belong in buildings.” –Building Owners and Managers Association. Smoking Position Paper. Washington, DC: Building Owners and Managers Association.

  • Going smoke-free lowers the risk of fires and accidental injuries, which can reduce your insurance costs. Smoke-free businesses have negotiated for lower fire and property insurance premiums, with some businesses winning reductions of 25–30 percent. The U.S. Smoking-Materials Fire Problem. Quincy, MA: National Fire Protection Association, November 2004.

  • Going smokefree reduces potential legal liability. Nonsmokers harmed by secondhand smoke at work have won lawsuits and disability claims against their employers under a variety of legal remedies. –U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General.2000.

  • Restaurants in smokefree cities have a higher market value at resale (an average of 16%) than comparable restaurants located in cities that allow smoking indoors. - Smoke-free ordinances increase restaurant profit and value Alamar, B.C.; Glantz, S.A. Contemporary Economic Policy 22(4): 520-525, October 2004.

 

Kentuckians SUPPOrt smoke-free policies

  • A broad based, solid majority of Kentucky voters across the political spectrum support smoke-free policies
  • The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, and American Lung Association all support enactment of comprehensive smokefree policies. (See list of additional local endorsers)

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